Constrained but not contained: Patterns of everyday life and the limits of segregation in 1920s Harlem

Stephen Robertson's article, "Constrained but not contained: Patterns of everyday life and the limits of segregation in 1920s Harlem," has appeared in The Ghetto in Global History: 1500 to the Present, edited by Wendy Z. Goldman and Joe William Trotter, Jr. (Routledge, 2017). The article is based on the presentation he gave to the Sawyer… Continue reading Constrained but not contained: Patterns of everyday life and the limits of segregation in 1920s Harlem

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Mapping a Riot: Harlem, 1935

Cross-posted from drstephenrobertson.com On March 19, 2016, I participated in the Working Group on Interpreting the History of Race Riots and Racialized Mass Violence in the Context of “Black Lives Matter,” at the National Council on Public History Conference, in Baltimore. Prior to the meeting, members of the Working Group contributed short posts on their projects… Continue reading Mapping a Riot: Harlem, 1935

A Review of Digital Harlem & My Response in the American Historical Review

The February 2016 issue of the American Historical Review includes an extended review of Digital Harlem — “Harlem Crime, Soapbox Speeches, and Beauty Parlors: Digital Historical Context and the Challenge of Preserving Source Integrity,” by Joshua Sternfeld, and my response, “Digital Mapping as a Research Tool: Digital Harlem: Everyday Life, 1915–1930.”  The AHR provides authors with a free-access link… Continue reading A Review of Digital Harlem & My Response in the American Historical Review

Digital Harlem has moved

The server at the University of Sydney that has been home to Digital Harlem has been shut down, and the site has been migrated to a new server. The site's new address is: http://digitalharlem.orgThe move has been a complex one, and unfortunately the map overlay does not currently work, so you can only see either the historical… Continue reading Digital Harlem has moved

Digital Harlem in New York City

On October 17, 2011, I will be talking about Digital Harlem at the CUNY Graduate Center, 365 5th Avenue.  The paper, "Digital Harlem: Race and Place in the 1920s," will be presented in the Skylight Room (9th floor), at 7.pm. Thanks to Joshua Freeman for organizing this event, and to the Ph.D. Program in History, Interactive… Continue reading Digital Harlem in New York City